SLA Certificate–Teaching portfolio

Your teaching portfolio, complete and assembled as you would to submit to a job search

The Teaching Portfolio requires graduate students to document the sum of their college teaching experience and articulate the unique philosophy of teaching that they have acquired from it. It also allows graduate students to articulate their teaching experience and ability for presentation to prospective academic employers. The format we have chosen is consistent with portfolios that are increasingly part of an application for an academic position.

Include an annotated assemblage* of the following materials:

  1. Teaching philosophy statement: students are asked to write a teaching statement as part of the requirements for LING 564
  2. Annotated newly developed syllabi: one introductory level and one advanced level course in your discipline.  Note:  If you have not actually taught these courses, which will often be the case, these syllabi should provide a course plan (title, level, description, objectives, readings, methods and approach for instruction and grading, assignments, what topics will be addressed in what order over the course of the semester, etc.).
  3. Annotated sample course materials: for example, task-based or communicative activities; rubrics, homework assignments; assessments.
  4. Annotated lesson plan
  5. Annotated Student evaluations.  Note:  Most of you will be able to access your student evaluations online (http://www.yale.edu/sfas/registrar/). There is no convenient download function, so you will need to copy and paste these into a document. We recommend that you annotate each set of evaluations with a brief description of the course and your role and your reflections on what you learned about the course and your teaching from the student comments. You may format the evaluations for readability, but please include the complete set of evaluations about your teaching.

* You may annotate according to your preferences. One common model is to include an italicized paragraph at the beginning of each document (particularly syllabi, course materials, and evaluations) providing context for the course, how the materials were or will be used, and any additional information that would help the reader more fully understand the courses you refer to. Alternatively, you may include a separate page at the beginning of the portfolio describing each piece. If you have questions about the annotation process, please feel free to contact us.